Italian region orders GM maize fields destroyed, Monsanto reportedly urges farmers to resist ruling

PIEDMONT, Italy, July 15, 2003 -- CropChoice news -- ABC News, 07/12/03:Italy's Piedmont region has ordered the destruction of 381 hectares of maize fields thought to contain genetic material, a spokesman for its president said.

"The President of Piedmont region, Enzo Ghigo, has ordered the destruction of 381 hectares of genetically modified maize in the region," spokesman Massimo Tesio said.

Mr Tesio said the order would be published on Saturday (local time) and carried out no more than five days later.

Under Italian law, the sowing of genetically modified crops in open fields is banned under a so-called "zero tolerance" policy.

The Piedmont authorities did not say how the contamination of the maize arose.

Farming sources said the farmers on whose land the crops were growing were not being held responsible.

The farmers expected to be compensated by the regional government.

Officials of Italy's biggest farmers' association, Coldiretti - a staunch opponent of commercial biotech plantings in Italy, said the group welcomed the news as it underscored Piedmont's support for the "zero tolerance" policy.

The Bologna-based Italian Seeds Association (AIS), which represents 175 seed companies, said any decision to destroy maize fields underlined the inability of Piedmont to handle the situation.

"They [Piedmont] are trying to put all the responsibility on the seed companies," AIS director Marco Nardi said.

"The Piedmont decision is a disheartening confirmation of the authority's incapacity to manage the problem.

"Interfering with fields that were certainly sowed with traditional seed varieties... is an absurd decision that will end up just penalizing the farmers who are involved."

Regional public prosecutors had decided in a meeting late on Thursday local time to give Piedmont the right to decide whether to destroy the crops.

The maize fields, located between Turin and Cuneo, were found to contain genetic material during a recent routine inspection.

Piedmont is a major growing area for maize, Italy's biggest cereal crop in tonnage terms. Italy is the European Union's second biggest maize producer after France.

Maize harvesting in Italy will start in a few weeks' time.


Meanwhile, according to the following story, Monsanto and Pioneer have urged farmers not to destroy the corn.

Monsanto, Pioneer urge Italian Farmers to Fight GM crop cull

MILAN, Italy, July 14, 2003, (AFX)--ample.com: La Repubblica was cited as reporting on Sunday that Monsanto Co and Pioneer Hi-Bred are urging farmers to oppose demands by the Piedmont regional authority that they destroy genetically modified crops.

The story says that the newspaper cited the leader of a farmers' organization, after farmers began meeting legal demands for them to plough up fields of maize grown from genetically modified seed, it said.

Giorgio Ferrero, from the Coldiretti farmers’ organization, was quoted as saying, "Representatives of the two companies are contacting farmers one by one to convince them not to destroy the fields. In exchange, they are offering free legal assistance and asking them to sign a mandate to appeal the order that obliges them to destroy the crop."
http://www.iii.co.uk/shares/?type=news&articleid=4696158&action=article

And, it appears to be working:


Italy farmers resist order to wreck GMO-contaminated corn crop

ROME, Italy, July 14, 2003, Reuters via Agnet: Farm officials were cited as saying on Monday that farmers are resisting an order by the Piedmont region in north Italy to destroy almost 400 hectares of maize fields thought to contain genetic material, and may take the matter to court.

An official with Coldiretti, Italy's biggest farmers' association and, the story says, an opponent of commercial biotech sowings, was cited as telling Reuters that just 10 hectares of maize near Cuneo had been destroyed by Monday morning.

The story explains that Piedmont on Friday ordered the destruction within five days of 381 hectares of maize found to contain genetically modified organisms (GMOs) after a recent routine inspection.

Under Italian law, the sowing of genetically modified crops in open fields is banned.

Officials with Confagricoltura, another farmers' group, questioned whether farmers who destroyed their crops would receive compensation.

Some Confagricoltura farmers were considering going to court to challenge the Piedmont order because the amount of genetic material had not been established, farm sources said.

The Piedmont authorities did not say how the contamination of the maize arose.